An Interview With Elena Parashko – Author of the Survival Guide for Artists

Reader Reviews of the Survival Guide For Artists

Most artists have great knowledge about subjects, technique, color theory, etc – all the necessary elements to produce anything from good to excellent art. But many artists, including myself, find it difficult to reach an audience that is interested in what we do. “Survival Guide for Artists” offers smart, helpful and practical solutions to dealing with this problem. I would recommend any artist planning to build an artistic career on solid foundations to buy this book and read it, twice. It will save plenty of headaches and frustration. Congratulations on this book!  EXTREMELY USEFUL!

J.A. Castillo, Lexington, KY USA

I loved this book. Very well written in simple, straightforward language. It’s a wonderful read and a good reminder of what we need to do to nurture our creative side.

Diane F. Mcgregor (on Amazon.com)

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about Elena Parashko’s Survival Guide for Artists

About the Author: Elena Parashko

Elena Parashko is an artist, teacher, and writer based in Sydney, Australia. She has a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in adult education and nearly thirty years teaching experience. In only ten years Elena transformed her life from a college literacy and communication teacher to being a full time professional artist who annually has teaching and exhibiting residencies in Fiji, Hamilton Island, Norfolk Island, Italy, Bora Bora, and Tahiti. She is a contributing writer for Professional Artist magazine in the United States and Leisure Painter magazine in the United Kingdom. Her artwork has also been published in numerous art and home-decorator magazines in Australia. Elena's Survival Guide for Artists is a best seller in Amazon.com's Business of Art category.

10 Comments

  1. I enjoyed this free talk, and thank you so much for it! I just wished there could have been some conversation about “building an audience”. Help! I will definitely look into getting Elena’s book, and if there’s anything you can send my way about building that audience, I’d so appreciate it! Thank you so much!
    Sincerely, Keith Lamb
    (Ps. I will leave you my website: keithlambart.com and @ the footer of the website is an icon for my Instagram page where you can see a lot of my recent work. https://www.instagram.com/keithl71/

  2. Great interview, it is a definite motivational tool to keep creating. Especially when the confidence can sometimes wain. I think even the most confident artist can sometimes feel the pangs of self doubt creeping in. Watching, reading etc about successes reminds us we are all in the same boat at one time or another. Perhaps the “trick” is to think outside the box. Bring something unique to the table, and have several projects on the go. It definetly keeps moving!

  3. I bought your book a month ago. It is a wonderful book!! There is a paragraph about becoming the person who can do the things necessary to have what you want. I made a copy of that and read it everyday. I love that the questions make me think not about being an artist but about myself. Some questions I still cannot answer because I don’t yet know the answer. Thank you for writing this book.

    1. Hi Christene
      Thank you for your positive feedback on my book. I’m so pleased you are benefiting from the ideas it contains. That really was my reason for writing it. Wishing you all the best on your journey and have lots of fun along the way!

  4. I love the great advice and inspiration. I’ve been a sculptor for over 30 years and fairly successful with a good solid resume. I’ve recently been doing more marketing– researching and then showing my work if it looks like we might fit. However, I’ve recently been told by a few gallery owners (which were very promising in my research) that they only deal with art publishers and not the artist. What is this? I’ve had art agents in the past most often with very negative results. The most recent gallery told me that having a publisher is much more important in that it assures the gallery that the artist is exceptional and has the credentials to be showing art in galleries. So, can you help me understand this and perhaps suggest a solution to this growing trend?

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