Ask a Gallery Owner | Artistic Consistency

In this week’s episode, I discuss the importance of artistic consistency and what it means to be consistent.

Sample Images to Illustrate Consistency

Karen Jensen
Lucy Dickens
John Horejs
Richard Harrington

What Would You Like Me to Discuss?

What would you like to see me discuss in next week’s session? Post your comments or questions in the comments section below and then join me next Monday for the live session!

Starving to Successful

StSBookSHave you always wondered what it takes to show your work in galleries? Is your work being seen by qualified collectors?

In his Amazon.com best-selling book, Xanadu Gallery owner Jason Horejs shares insights gained over a life-time in the art business.

Learn more and order today.

2015-01-07 14_43_10-CSS Button Generator

About the Author: Jason Horejs

Jason Horejs is the Owner of Xanadu Gallery, author of Dad was an Artist | A Survivor's Story and best selling books "Starving" to Successful & How to Sell Art , publisher of reddotblog.com, and founder of ARTsala. Jason has helped thousands of artists prepare themselves to more effectively market their work, build relationships with galleries and collectors, and turn their artistic passion into a viable business. Connect with Jason on Facebook

19 Comments

  1. This was a most helpful podcast Jason. Your explanation of “consistency” was excellent, clear and to the point. As you understand, this is the most difficult for us artists. Although, since I’ve begun my abstract work, this is much easier. They are obviously consistent to me where my other work isn’t.

    I also like your method of handling S&H costs on your website. I plan to update mine soon and will incorporate that feature. Thanks again.

    1. Could be emotional content, but it’s also the broader focus of the work. For example, your subject matter in a particular piece might be a mountain clearing and aspens, while the theme of the body of work is something like “remote natural vistas”. An abstract artist might focus on themes of personal interaction or light and shadow.

  2. What happened to the slideshow of images you said you were going to show on the second camera at the end of your video? How do we access them?

  3. Very good thank you for you words on consistency.
    I am an artist. Painting in oil. My theme is wild life and portrait painting.
    Q: What is the best way to find a gallery that may like your theme/subject matter/style/etc.
    Not all galleries are the same.
    Is there a national listing of galleries somewhere? It would be nice to have a system for artist to apply to get into galleries in their area/region that is really managed and is up to date showing openings, new gallery openings and their interest. As you well know, producing is the main effort for an artist. If the galleries could shoulder a registry it would help the artists find the right venue.
    I’d be very happy to be involved in that if it does not exist.
    Please feel free to email me.

  4. I’m as old as dirt and am self-taught on drawing/painting for as early as I can remember. After listening to this video, I feel I really don’t stand a chance in the art world. I do all sorts of mediums, themes, and paint anything my eyes appreciate. I find that by doing a variety of art it keeps my mind excited, but am I hindering my success? I have sold quite a few pieces to repeat customers out-of-province through my FB site. I currently do not belong to any gallery as I’ve not had any success with that at all. Privately, I just feel so lost and struggling even though I’m told that people love my work but they don’t buy. Only if you have time or interest, I can give you my address for my art.

    1. You aren’t alone in feeling this way MaryAnn. I completely understand what you are saying about creating a variety of work to stay engaged. I’m not suggesting you have to stop doing that, but I would encourage you to try to create 20 pieces that are consistent in terms of medium, style and theme in order to create a cohesive body of work that you can show collectors and galleries. You can continue to create other work outside that body, but just don’t show it for right now. Focus on creating consistent work for a while and edit out work that doesn’t fit the style you are pursuing for consistency. From experience, I can tell you that you will quickly see an increase in both interest and sales as you are able to show consistent work. Give it a try and let me know what you find!

  5. Hi Jason. Could you give us your ideas about discounting your art for a special limited time sale? I have a lot of older pieces in my studio that I would like to move out. I considered having a “Sizzling Summer Sale” on a half dozen select pieces . Is there a way to do this without diminishing the value of your work in the eyes of your collectors who have purchased at full value. I have a consistent pricing plan.

    Thanks so much for all the wonderful valuable information you so generously give us artists

  6. Hi Jason, I have a technical question about gallery wrap canvas, I know with gallery wrap canvasses you don’t need a frame but should be painted all on sides, would you consider the standard ( 5/8 depth) stretch canvas that was also painted on the sides a gallery wrap, that you don’t need a frame? Thank you, Lee

  7. Hello,
    Thank you so much for all the information you have given us in your podcast! You have clarified several questions about consistency that I’ve had dealing with in my work!

  8. Thanks, Jason for all you do to help gallery owners and artist find their way…I’m wondering, with the work that I have produced as an artist and how I’ve displayed it (I posted it on your Facebook page) would it be a faux pas to invite any gallery owner to visit? The galleries where I live are all downtown Truth or Consequences, NM about 5 minutes away from my space…Thanks, Andria, Elephant Butte, NM

  9. The past few months I’ve just started looking at my work (fine art photography) as a “collection” instead of individual pieces. I grouped select images in a temporary online portfolio to see how they flowed together…I was pleasantly surprised! The subject matter varies but it’s all aesthetically and stylistically cohesive. And since this mental ‘shift’ I’ve gotten a collection of my work in my first local gallery (started as a one month show last month and turned into a resident artist spot! Yay!) and have a two month showing scheduled at a prestigious gallery downtown. This idea came to me after seeing an online photo contest for a collection/set of work. It made me look at my work from a different perspective…it was like a switch flipped and has been a complete game changer. So, I know the information you’re sharing here is spot on. I just wish it hadn’t taken 7 years of shooting artistically for me to figure it out. *ha* Thank you for sharing your insight and knowledge. I hope to learn much from you.

  10. Jason—thanks so much for answering my question. If I may ask a few more— I have several series going on in my work. They are a series of still lifes based on a common element and rendered in either wc or oil; a series in wc on orchids (that have recently been juried into a national show); Adirondack landscapes in oil and wc, some of which are plein air, and what I call “side-by-side,” painting favorite subjects in both wc and oil. Each is a series with multiple paintings –should I pick only one series to approach a gallery with? I posted this on your FB site with a few examples of my work. Thanks again.
    Mary

Leave a Reply to Andria Olinger Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *