RedDot Podcast | Episode 004 | Sales Trends for the 2016-2017 Season

In this episode, Jason will look at how the 2016-2017 high season went for Xanadu Gallery. There were several interesting trends, and Jason will explore these trends, along with their underlying external and internal factors.

 

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Starving to Successful

StSBookSHave you always wondered what it takes to show your work in galleries? Is your work being seen by qualified collectors?

In his Amazon.com best-selling book, Xanadu Gallery owner Jason Horejs shares insights gained over a life-time in the art business.

Learn more and order today.

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About the Author: Jason Horejs

Jason Horejs is the Owner of Xanadu Gallery, author of best selling books "Starving" to Successful & How to Sell Art , publisher of reddotblog.com, and founder of ARTsala. Jason has helped thousands of artists prepare themselves to more effectively market their work, build relationships with galleries and collectors, and turn their artistic passion into a viable business. Connect with Jason on Facebook

17 Comments

  1. Had a better 2016 than 2015, especially at Holiday season. Landscapes (my subject) with vistas and drama (e.g. weather) sold well especially those of local areas and surrounding states.

    I would have like to hear what types of paintings are selling, what customers say about, for example, what they like in abstract works, realistic works, etc.

    Thanks for your efforts, the podcast generated some marketing ideas for me as an artist!

    1. It’s a great question about types of art being sold. I always hesitate to share that kind of information because I feel it can be misleading for readers. If I tell you that we’re primarily selling abstract art and you are a landscape painter, what do you do with that information? I wouldn’t want an artist to think about changing style or genre because of what we’re seeing in terms of our sales.

      Additionally, I only show the work of about 30 artists in the gallery, so if I tell you that most of what we are selling is more contemporary in style, that may only tell you that my gallery has more contemporary artists.

      Rather than trying to create what sells, I encourage artists to sell what they create, whatever it may be. We are in a very diverse art market, and there are buyers for every style and genre. It’s your job to find the best venues to showcase your work, whatever it may be.

  2. Hi,
    Excellent podcast and very timely. I’m the operations manager at On The Edge Gallery in Scottsdale and I was just reviewing our sales statistics yesterday. We are about 22% ahead of sales over last year and our average sale has declined a bit. I hadn’t actually reviewed volume of sales but I’m sure we are experiencing the same trend. I’ll be sharing your podcast with our board of directors along with our sales statistics later this week. Thank you for sharing this very relevant information on sales trends this year in the art market in Scottsdale.
    Valerie Hildebrand
    Operations Manager, On The Edge Gallery
    Info@ontheedgegallery.com
    http://www.ontheedgegallery.com

  3. I am an emerging artist based in Brighton on the south coast of the Uk so I wasn’t affected by the election in the US, although an election has just been called here for June so we shall see. On that note I do paint some political art & had one of my pieces published in the local press on polling day of our last election which gave me a lot of exposure & help with my marketing efforts! Thanks for the podcast Jason, always very interesting & informative…

  4. Congratulations on your trend of increased sales as a business over the last couple seasons. Could you please elaborate on what you’re experiencing in types of sales as a trend such as size of works, medium, genre. Thank you.

  5. I also would like to know what trends you saw in types of paintings that were bought. I recently heard that “people aren’t buying representational right now.” This may or may not be true but would like to know what you have seen in your area. Is that something you keep track of? Thank you.

  6. Thanks again Jason for this podcast regarding your sales analysis in your gallery with the many factors that have contributed to this. I also love hearing your words of encouragement and stadegies for ever building success rates in artist’s careers.
    I can happily report that 2017 has unfolded with three major painting sales (in size and price) and a few small ones with future sales in the wings. Indeed my sales already exceed 2016.
    Now, is this due to our economy? Is it due to my ever increasing business outreach, inventory increase and reginition? Probably all of the above and more that I don’t know yet how to factor into the equation.
    Bottom line is that I will take this roll and work even harder.
    May art sales continue to rise and result in a healthier climate for all recipients, including the collectors and those who venture into the rays of each artwork!

  7. Both 2015 and 2016 were banner years for me. However in 2016 my sales volume stayed the same and my gross went down – I sold more small paintings than large paintngs. My first quarter of 2017 is quite slow. We had some significant winter weather events here this winter that I think had some effect on tourist traffic. One of my takeaways is that people like my small works, and I should make an effort to create even more. (I paint brightly colored landscapes using heavily saturated watercolor on a metallic background. I describe them as “contemporary realism”.)

  8. Jason – glad to hear things are improving for you. Sadly I’m not sharing in this despite moving into different areas both location wise, outlet-type wise and with new work. I have seen quite an upturn in kudos – featured artist, invitational shows, multiple awards and such, but these have not yet translated to sales. Hmmm.

  9. Boy you hit the nail on the head. When the recession started my whole lower end sales just disappeared I was still selling more expensive stuff as well as the price point 300-700. This year I had a big big jump in sales starting in about November, have been doing well so far. I do think that people are more enthusiastic about the economy than they have been for a while so that optimism is carrying over to their discretionary spending which is, of course, art 🙂

  10. Very informative podcast, Jason … thanks.
    We can’t do one thing about external factors whether it be political turmoil or the stock market … it’s always something. Solid groundwork in the face of such events will go a long way in rising above that which you have zero control over.
    What you can do:
    Get better … quit churning out middling work just to produce “something that sells.” I grit my teeth over this one. Size, subject matter, even price does not matter that much … the quality of the piece does.
    Subject matter is so individual what sells in one region won’t in another. Local identity is simply that – local. I may not sell my Asian pieces in Texas but I still intend to paint them … I want to grow as an artist.
    Find a more productive venue to sell your work. I sold more in the last six months than the previous year (high end markets with an agent).
    Beyond that, I am well aware I need to solicit some A list galleries to elevate my reputation. Working on it ….
    Develop a patron/client following … do what Jason does 🙂 email and keep in touch.
    Find and settle on your voice, no one else’s … is it style, subject matter, or individual technique that draws people? Sales goals are one thing … artistic goals are quite another. Don’t neglect them.

  11. One aspect of your approach may have more to do with your increased sales and ability to attract buyers, and that is your willingness and openness to helping others. I feel, in my own case an affirmation of this. Thank you for setting this example – even if not everyone “gets it”. There is a vast difference between us in the area of financial success, but I do receive a satisfaction from the solid confirmation people give back to me because I am consciously being positive and enthusiastic about what I do in my art and otherwise.

  12. Thank you for the podcast. Election years have been poison for my business, and I come to dread them. I saw my business drop off terribly in the winter months-the worst winter since I started professionally 23 years ago. I felt the election upset unsettled buyers. Business seemed to rebound this month. Of course, after some time I realized lot of factors caused my business drop-off. I have responded by doubling down on the quality of my work, and starting the long process of building a body of work that is of different subjects than what I have done in the past.

  13. Hi Jason. So happy to hear of your successful year for Xanadu. I think you are putting out positive energy as you continue to offer insights, education and services to artists and other gallery owners. The positive you are putting out there returns to you multiplied and I am just so excited to see it manifesting for you!

  14. Jason,
    Thank you for doing these. Great opportunity to listen and do “deskwork” all at once. You observations are confirmation of things we see in our daily lives. Things are on an uptick.

  15. Hi All,
    I am finding that 2017 is a good year for sales. I am more aggressively marketing my work and forcing the market by doing Art Fairs, paying the up-front expenses and hoping I can make the sales to warrant the expense. I’m guessing that if the ArtFair process pays off for the major galleries, it could possibly pay-off for me too. Even if I do not make the actual sales, the added exposure and recruitment of a gallery maybe enough of a payoff to warrant the expense. I would love to get the perspective of others on this proposition. So far, this year, after a sample of one, I have bet correctly and the profits were much more than the added expense.
    Of course, recruiting a gallery would be better than doing the next several art fairs on my own money, that part of the bet has not yet reached fruition.

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