RedDot Podcast | Episode 018 | Rules, Regulations, Policies and Procedures in the Art Business

As you interact with potential customers, it’s inevitable that you will run into challenging situations. In today’s podcast I ask how important it is to develop rules to deal with those situations. Should you have try to anticipate every situation and have a policy in place to deal with those situations? How important is it to be consistent in your interactions with your clients?

What do you think?

Do you feel it’s important to have strict rules you follow when working with clients? Have rules served you well in your art business? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.

Starving to Successful

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In his Amazon.com best-selling book, Xanadu Gallery owner Jason Horejs shares insights gained over a life-time in the art business.

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About the Author: Jason Horejs

Jason Horejs is the Owner of Xanadu Gallery, author of best selling books "Starving" to Successful & How to Sell Art , publisher of reddotblog.com, and founder of ARTsala. Jason has helped thousands of artists prepare themselves to more effectively market their work, build relationships with galleries and collectors, and turn their artistic passion into a viable business. Connect with Jason on Facebook

10 Comments

  1. Great subject Jason. I agree with how you handle the process of sales. It’s retail and customer service common sense. Common sense is sometimes lacking in certain retail settings. You are building relationships not just looking for the one time purchase.
    Dana Kern

  2. Thank you Jason for the question. I really think building relationships is key, and even like to follow the good ol’ truth from my grandmother’s Bible–the Golden Rule–do unto others as you would have them do to you… So, treating others with respect and then be willing to steer them in the right direction if what you have is not what they are looking for. It is not about the money but the service. Then the money comes as a result of good service. Clients will remember your care for them and refer you to others. This is proved in my experience. Holly Friesen

  3. Thank you for this podcast:, The thoughts that you have provided on your podcast our confirmation of the thoughts and actions and I have implemented actually within the past few weeks and have come up quite successful and I’m pretty happy with it. Just recently, I established a pop-up exhibition where it garnered Quite a bit of income which was desperately needed so I’m totally thrilled about it and hopefully the subsequent next pop-up shows will be just as successful. Thank you once again Jason for your thoughts and your efforts and helping us Succeed Drive is creative people And hope to be able to see you soon! No, still trying to navigate Inappropriate sales through the website. But as with all things, patience is a virtue so I am hopeful and forward looking to that time of sales to their website

  4. I love your great idea when someone wants to photograph my work of saying I can send you a better photo…then you get their info and can continue a dialog with them. I found that once a person is gone, they are usually gone for good!! This keeps you in their memory!

  5. I totally agree with your approach to customers and how you handle each scenario. Thank you for sharing this knowledge with us. Until I had read some of your prior articles on the subject of people taking pictures of artwork hung in galleries, I did not want people taking pictures of my artwork. What you say makes total sense then and today also.

  6. Excellent podcast Jason. Rules that can’t be enforced are useless, so unless you want to have a gallery cop for the job, don’t bother. I totally agree that treating the client with respect is the only way to be successful. That’s what people remember even if they’re not ready to buy at that time.

  7. There is a fear that if you take a photo of artwork that they are going to steal your idea. I think it’s probably easy to go there for most artists, and we need to remember that we make original art. If another artist were to reproduce something it would be different, it would be the other persons interpretation. Work hard and stay positive, and don’t get bogged down by the negative jealousy.
    Also, I loved the idea of offering to email them a picture and information, because then you get them on your mailing list. Brilliant!

  8. Leave a note later. Finally had time to listen to this one. I agree with you Jason. Hard and fast rules make enemies. Work together, work it out. Technology has gone wild. It is an impossible situation to police – photo’s are marketing. Agree again!

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