Does an Art Education Matter?

Whenever I’m talking to artists about their biographies or resumes, the question of art education, or lack thereof, often comes up. Artists who have completed extensive academic training want to know how best to leverage that training to build their credibility. Artists who don’t have formal training, want to know if it will hurt their prospects for gallery representation and sales.

Should Artists Present Artwork in Bins at Art Shows, or is it a Distraction?

In the comments on a recent post about giving buyers too many choices, artist Eric Saint Georges asked In a show: What about the bins? Would you also limit the…

Ask a Gallery Owner | The Pros and Cons of Artist Owned and Operated Galleries

In the past, I’ve discussed different models for galleries: traditional commercial galleries (consignment), co-op galleries and “vanity” galleries. A recent email reminded me that there’s another variant of the traditional…

Ask a Gallery Owner: What Advice Would You Give to Someone About to Open a Gallery?

I regularly receive emails from readers who are considering opening art galleries. These prospective gallery owners are looking for any insights or advice I might offer. I’m happy to help…

Choice Overload | Cramming in too Much Art Hurts your Sales

I have long maintained that it’s a bad idea to try and show too much art at once. Whether the art is being shown in a gallery, or at a weekend art festival, I believe it’s better to show a limited number of pieces instead of trying to cram everything you can into your space.

I believe that having too much art in one space hurts you in several ways. First, it makes your display look crowded and unprofessional. Most art needs some space to breathe. Your display will look better if each piece has its own visual space.

Becoming a Better Art Salesperson | Restating Questions and Objections

The typical reaction to a question or objection raised by a potential customer is to try and provide an immediate answer. After gaining some sales experience, you will have heard all the questions and objections, and will have a ready answer for each. I would encourage you to resist the temptation to blurt out an immediate answer, and instead restate your client’s question or objection in your own words. This is a simple thing to do once you get the hang of it, but you will be amazed at how much it impacts your ability to help your customer solve her own questions or perceived problems. That’s a real key – helping your client solve her own problems, instead of trying to solve them for her.

Artist Needs Advice: “How Can I Transport Paintings Across the Canadian/US Border by Car?”

I have been emailing with a Canadian artist who needs to ship paintings to a gallery in the US. She lives on the border and is planning to drive the…

Create a Mobile Art Hanging/Installation Kit

I’ve written before about how much I enjoy having the opportunity to install art in clients’ homes. Installations are a great opportunity to provide customer service and build relationships with…

Ask a Gallery Owner | Does an Artist’s Death Result in an Increase in the Value of that Artist’s Work?

There’s an old, morbid joke that in order for an artist to see a significant increase in the value of her work, all she has to do is die. Underlying…

RedDot Podcast | Episode 022 | An Interview with Ninth Street Women Author Mary Gabriel

Many of you know that I love art history and deeply enjoy reading about the artists who made  history. Earlier in the year I had a number of you reach…