Ask a Gallery Owner | Should I Use a Pseudonym?

Do you think it’s a bad business move to give yourself an artist name? If when you may concerned or want to protect your private life from your business life would that be a sufficient reason to have an artist name?

I was wondering what your thoughts were?

–Victoria

Many artists have asked variations of this same question. I’ve worked with artists who use their real names, along with a number of artists who have adopted pseudonyms. It’s quite common for actors and authors to change their names.

Should Artists Present Artwork in Bins at Art Shows, or is it a Distraction?

In the comments on a recent post about giving buyers too many choices, artist Eric Saint Georges asked, In a show: What about the bins? Would you also limit the…

Online Critique Group Recording 2021-03-03 | Featured Artist Mike DeCesare (Spokane, WA)

Artwork Title: Cascade Morning Medium: Photography Size: 15 x 21 Price: 250 Title: Gamble Trail Medium: Photography Size: 11 x 17 Price: 160 Title: Forest Morning Medium: Photography Size: 11…

Ask a Gallery Owner: What Advice Would You Give to Someone About to Open a Gallery?

I regularly receive emails from readers who are considering opening art galleries. These prospective gallery owners are looking for any insights or advice I might offer. I’m happy to help…

Choice Overload | Cramming in too Much Art Hurts your Sales

I have long maintained that it’s a bad idea to try and show too much art at once. Whether the art is being shown in a gallery, or at a weekend art festival, I believe it’s better to show a limited number of pieces instead of trying to cram everything you can into your space.

I believe that having too much art in one space hurts you in several ways. First, it makes your display look crowded and unprofessional. Most art needs some space to breathe. Your display will look better if each piece has its own visual space.

Online Critique Group Recording 2021-02-17

Becoming a Better Art Salesperson | Restating Questions and Objections

The typical reaction to a question or objection raised by a potential customer is to try and provide an immediate answer. After gaining some sales experience, you will have heard all the questions and objections, and will have a ready answer for each. I would encourage you to resist the temptation to blurt out an immediate answer, and instead restate your client’s question or objection in your own words. This is a simple thing to do once you get the hang of it, but you will be amazed at how much it impacts your ability to help your customer solve her own questions or perceived problems. That’s a real key – helping your client solve her own problems, instead of trying to solve them for her.

Online Critique Group Recording 2020-02-10 | Featured Artist Sandy Johnson (Vero Beach, FL)

  The Artwork (click to see larger images) Title: Beach Tree Bingo Medium: Acrylic Size: 30 x 40 Price: 1200 Title: Illuminate Medium: Acrylic Size: 48 x 24 Price: 1,200…

Create a Mobile Art Hanging/Installation Kit

I’ve written before about how much I enjoy having the opportunity to install art in clients’ homes. Installations are a great opportunity to provide customer service and build relationships with…

Online Critique Group Recording 2021-02-03