Did your Family and Friends Discourage You From Becoming an Artist?

I recently read an article about Richard Branson, serial entrepreneur and founder of Virgin Records and Virgin Airlines, where he talked about the reluctance many people feel when trying to…

Follow up

How to Follow Up and Close More Art Sales

I’ve mentioned before that we don’t hand out photos or brochures in the gallery. Instead, when a potential client is leaving without making a purchase, we take the opportunity to…

Collective Wisdom: Finding Your Bread and Butter

In speaking with a number of artists who have built financially successful careers, I have observed that many of them have stabilized and strengthened their art business by creating a…

4 Critical Steps to Sell More Art

“What do you do?” you’ve been asked many times. “I am an artist” is most likely the response that instantly comes to your lips. You have probably been giving this…

Branding: Artists, Build Your Brand Around Your Name

In today’s post, I would like to address a branding question that comes up quite frequently in relationship to branding for artists:

Should an artist use his or her own name when building a brand, or is it a good idea to create a business name and brand around that name instead?

The most common form of the question I hear is whether it’s okay to use the artist’s studio name instead of just using the artist’s name.

What Kind of Artwork Sells Best?

I’m often asked what kind of artwork sells best – traditional or contemporary, paintings or sculpture, large or small works? On its face, this is a pretty easy question to answer – all I have to do is look over my sales records to see which media and subjects have been selling the best. We’re constantly looking at this kind of information in the gallery to get a sense of where our sales are coming from. I’m hesitant to share this information, however, because I’m not certain how helpful it is for artists who read the blog.

The problem with this kind of data is that we are in such a small industry that it’s very, very difficult to draw truly useful information from these kinds of statistics. Sales can fluctuate dramatically from month to month, and what’s selling today, may not be selling tomorrow. I wouldn’t want an artist to change direction or think that what he or she is creating can’t sell because it’s not what’s “hot” at the moment.

How to Ship Paintings | A Step-by-Step Guide for Artists and Galleries

Paintings are both fragile and valuable and can prove a perplexing challenge to ship safely and efficiently. Read this free, step-by-step guide from Xanadu Gallery owner J. Jason Horejs to learn how to best approach the shipping process so that your artwork arrives safely. Learn tools, techniques and tricks Horejs has acquired during his 20 years in the gallery business.

Marketing Boost – Offer to Clean Past Client’s Artwork

One of your biggest enemies in building strong relationships with collectors is time. Your customers may never stop liking you and your work, but they may instead do something far…

To Title or Not to Title Your Art, That Is the Question

Last week I received an email from an artist asking about titling her work. This is one of the more common topics I discuss with artists. I understand that titling your artwork can become tiresome, and many artists feel that a title can get in the way of the artwork.

Do titles really matter? Can the wrong title prevent you from selling your artwork? Can the right title guarantee a sale? While the issue may seem like a minor one, it is an issue you will be dealing with constantly over the course of your career.

I am an advocate of titling artwork, and I feel titling deserves investment of time and thought – from my perspective in the gallery I see that titles matter to potential buyers.

Read my conversation thread with the artist below, and then share your thoughts about titles in the comments below. How do you feel about titles? How do you come up with your titles? Your experience input and opinion are of tremendous value in adding to the collective knowledge available to other artists who read the blog.

Choice Overload | Cramming in too Much Art Hurts your Sales

I have long maintained that it’s a bad idea to try and show too much art at once. Whether the art is being shown in a gallery, or at a weekend art festival, I believe it’s better to show a limited number of pieces instead of trying to cram everything you can into your space.

I believe that having too much art in one space hurts you in several ways. First, it makes your display look crowded and unprofessional. Most art needs some space to breathe. Your display will look better if each piece has its own visual space.